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dc.contributor.authorCasanueva Vicente, Ana 
dc.contributor.authorKotlarski, Sven
dc.contributor.authorHerrera García, Sixto 
dc.contributor.authorFernández Fernández, Jesús 
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez Llorente, José Manuel
dc.contributor.authorBoberg, Fredrik
dc.contributor.authorColette, Augustin
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Ole Bossing
dc.contributor.authorGoergen, Klaus
dc.contributor.authorJacob, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorKeuler, Klaus
dc.contributor.authorNikulin, Grigory
dc.contributor.authorTeichmann, Claas
dc.contributor.authorVautard, Robert
dc.contributor.otherUniversidad de Cantabriaes_ES
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-02T07:29:36Z
dc.date.available2017-10-02T07:29:36Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn0930-7575
dc.identifier.issn1432-0894
dc.identifier.otherCGL2010-22158-C02es_ES
dc.identifier.otherCGL2010-21869es_ES
dc.identifier.otherES1102es_ES
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10902/12000
dc.description.abstractDaily precipitation statistics as simulated by the ERA-Interim-driven EURO-CORDEX regional climate model (RCM) ensemble are evaluated over two distinct regions of the European continent, namely the European Alps and Spain. The potential added value of the high-resolution 12 km experiments with respect to their 50 km resolution counterparts is investigated. The statistics considered consist of wet-day intensity and precipitation frequency as a measure of mean precipitation, and three precipitation-derived indicators (90th percentile on wet days?90pWET, contribution of the very wet days to total precipitation?R95pTOT and number of consecutive dry days?CDD). As reference for model evaluation high resolution gridded observational data over continental Spain (Spain011/044) and the Alpine region (EURO4M-APGD) are used. The assessment and comparison of the two resolutions is accomplished not only on their original horizontal grids (approximately 12 and 50 km), but the high-resolution RCMs are additionally regridded onto the coarse 50 km grid by grid cell aggregation for the direct comparison with the low resolution simulations. The direct application of RCMs e.g. in many impact modelling studies is hampered by model biases. Therefore bias correction (BC) techniques are needed at both resolutions to ensure a better agreement between models and observations. In this work, the added value of the high resolution (before and after the bias correction) is assessed and the suitability of these BC methods is also discussed. Three basic BC methods are applied to isolate the effect of biases in mean precipitation, wet-day intensity and wet-day frequency on the derived indicators. Daily precipitation percentiles are strongly affected by biases in the wet-day intensity, whereas the dry spells are better represented when the simulated precipitation frequency is adjusted to the observed one. This confirms that there is no single optimal way to correct for RCM biases, since correcting some distributional features typically leads to an improvement of some aspects but to a deterioration of others. Regarding mean seasonal biases before the BC, we find only limited evidence for an added value of the higher resolution in the precipitation intensity and frequency or in the derived indicators. Thereby, evaluation results considerably depend on the RCM, season and indicator considered. High resolution simulations better reproduce the indicators? spatial patterns, especially in terms of spatial correlation. However, this improvement is not statistically significant after applying specific BC methods.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are grateful to Prof. C. Schär for his helpful comments and E. van Meijgaard for making available the RACMO model data. We acknowledge the observational data providers. Calculations for WRF311F were made using the TGCC super computers under the GENCI time allocation GEN6877. The WRF331A from CRP-GL (now LIST) was funded by the Luxembourg National Research Fund (FNR) through grant FNR C09/SR/16 (CLIMPACT). The KNMI-RACMO2 simulations were supported by the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and the Environment. The CCLM and REMO simulations were supported by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and performed under the Konsortial share at the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ). The CCLM simulations were furthermore supported by the Swiss National Supercomputing Centre (CSCS) under project ID s78. Part of the SMHI contribution was carried out in the Swedish Mistra-SWECIA programme founded by Mistra (the Foundation for Strategic Environmental Research). This work is supported by CORWES (CGL2010-22158-C02) and EXTREMBLES (CGL2010-21869) projects funded by the Spanish R&D programme and the European COST ACTION VALUE (ES1102). A. C. thanks the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness for the funding provided within the FPI programme (BES-2011-047612 and EEBB-I-13-06354). We also thank two anonymous referees for their useful comments that helped to improve the original manuscript.es_ES
dc.format.extent19 p.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherSpringeres_ES
dc.rights© Springer. The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00382-015-2865-xes_ES
dc.sourceClim Dyn (2016) 47(3-4): 719-737es_ES
dc.subject.otherRegional Climate Modelses_ES
dc.subject.otherEURO-CORDEXes_ES
dc.subject.otherAdded valuees_ES
dc.subject.otherBias correctiones_ES
dc.subject.otherPrecipitation indiceses_ES
dc.titleDaily precipitation statistics in a EURO-CORDEX RCM ensemble: added value of raw and bias-corrected high-resolution simulationses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.relation.publisherVersionhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00382-015-2865-xes_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsopenAccesses_ES
dc.identifier.DOI10.1007/s00382-015-2865-x
dc.type.versionacceptedVersiones_ES


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